Monday 26 September 2016

Mylan's hostile bid for Ireland-based drugs giant Perrigo likely to fail

Greg Roumeliotis

Published 13/11/2015 | 08:39

Packages of Walgreens branded over-the-counter medicines, manufactured by Perrigo Co., are arranged for a photograph in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, July 29, 2013. Perrigo, a U.S. maker of over-the-counter medicines, agreed to buy Irish drug company Elan Corp. for $8.6 billion, gaining a low-tax base for international expansion. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg
Packages of Walgreens branded over-the-counter medicines, manufactured by Perrigo Co., are arranged for a photograph in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, July 29, 2013. Perrigo, a U.S. maker of over-the-counter medicines, agreed to buy Irish drug company Elan Corp. for $8.6 billion, gaining a low-tax base for international expansion. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Generic drug maker Mylan $26bn hostile bid for peer Perrigo looked unlikely to succeed, a few hours before it was set to expire, a person familiar with the matter said.

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If confirmed, the outcome would represent a major victory for Perrigo's defiant Chief Executive Joseph Papa, and a bitter blow to Mylan's Executive Chairman Robert Coury, who snubbed an acquisition offer from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries to pursue Perrigo.

Around 40pc of Dublin-based Perrigo's ordinary shares had been tendered ten hours before the tender offer was due to expire on Friday, significantly short of Mylan's acceptance threshold of more than 50pc, the people said.

While more shares could still be tendered, many large institutional investors would have tendered their shares at this stage if they were going to accept the offer, the people added.

The sources declined to be identified because the tally is not yet official. Perrigo declined to comment, while representatives for Mylan did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Mylan, which first made a bid for Perrigo in April, went hostile in September, offering $75 in cash and 2.3 of its shares for each Perrigo share.

The deal's rejection will now focus investors' attention on Perrigo's standalone strategy. Papa has said he is open to dealmaking, and sources familiar with the matter said earlier on Thursday Perrigo had held merger talks with Endo International earlier in the fall.

Perrigo reported a better-than-expected profit for the third quarter last month, and said it would lay off 6pc of its global workforce and buy back shares worth $2bn.

Mylan had used a Dutch poison pill-style defense to fight a $40bn takeover by Teva, arguing that a deal was "without sound industrial logic or cultural fit" and that it would face regulatory hurdles.

Coury said last week that, while the purchase of Perrigo was good for both companies, Mylan could survive without it. He pointed to the very strong market position of EpiPen, Mylan's biggest-selling branded product, which treats emergency anaphylactic reactions to allergens.

Reuters

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