Friday 30 September 2016

AdLib: Keeping a close watch on our TV habits

Media & Marketing

Michael Cullen

Published 02/07/2015 | 02:30

ICAD managing director Elaine McDevitt and institute president Jake Walshe from Screen Scene
ICAD managing director Elaine McDevitt and institute president Jake Walshe from Screen Scene
Pictured at the 'TV Now TV Next' conference in the Dean Hotel are Geraldine O'Leary, RTE, Matthias Wenk, Lidl and Paul Moran, Mediaworks.
Composer John Walsh

With TAM reporting that advertisers spent over €217m on television last year, it means TV accounts for nearly a third of the Republic's €750m ad spend. The KPMG figures for TAM cover spot, sponsorship, product placement and advertiser funded programming (AFP) revenue. Most Irish adults were glued to TV for an average of three hours 28 minutes a day.

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Some 91pc watch live broadcasts and 9pc time-shifted shows. Irish adults see an average of 37 TV ads a day.

As UTV Ireland finds the going gloomy in the bid to lure viewers, TV3's fortunes shine ahead of a planned sale by British owner private equity fund manager Doughty Hanson. Meanwhile, RTE continues to sit comfy on the TV couch.

But as an RTE advertisers' conference on the future of Ireland's TV market showed, there's no room for complacency.

RTE's news and current affairs business editor David Murphy shared some economic 'known unknowns' - not least what problems a 'Brexit' vote to quit the EU might pose for Irish exporters. RTE's head of innovation Glen Mulcahy explained how unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) - drones to mere mortals - are transforming the broadcasting landscape by allowing viewers watch from the air as events occur.

But it wasn't until groups of advertisers and agency executives took to the stage that the real 'TV Now TV Next' conference got going. Havas Media boss Graham Taylor cut to the chase by suggesting TV is increasingly for old people as younger folk migrate to devices. Young consumers are no longer mobile-first, they're now mobile-only, Taylor added.

Taylor says TV is set to change beyond recognition, marked by a switch from household subscriptions/licences to personal sign-ups. One-to-one communications will be the norm.

Mindshare's Ken Nolan said consumers control what they want to watch and set the TV agenda. It's not about appointment to view, it's about appointment to interact.

Tesco's Nora Torpey says TV's "sea of sameness" must go and supermarket chains are as guilty here as anyone.

Marketers should embrace content to which consumers relate, like AIB's Toughest Trade sponsorship with the GAA.

MediaVest's Helen O'Rourke said clients are looking for concrete audience figures and agencies can't provide them.

But OMD's Andy Pierce criticised the obsession with viewer numbers. Pierce said there should be less preoccupation with audience sizes and more about engaging viewers. Pictured at the 'TV Now TV Next' conference in the Dean Hotel are Geraldine O'Leary, RTE, Matthias Wenk, Lidl and Paul Moran, Mediaworks.

Advertise or rebrand a Pet Rock or some other useless item of your choosing.

That's the brief for applicants to this year's Upstarts programme from the Institute of Creative Advertising and Design (ICAD). Pet Rock was the brainchild of ad exec Gary Dahl, who had the idea for the perfect pet - a rock.

After all, a rock doesn't have to be fed, walked, bathed or groomed.

There are no vet bills and it won't upset you by disobeying orders, getting sick or dying. The perfect, albeit useless pet. Well, Dahl wasn't so daft. He marketed ordinary, everyday rocks as if they were live pets and sold 1.5m of them in six months, making him a millionaire.

Now in its 10th year, 168 young talents have taken part in Upstarts.

Up to 24 applicants - 12 each on advertising and design - can sign up. To be considered, applicants need to answer a specific brief and submit it with a €20 entry fee and a current portfolio or personal website by July 14.

Workshops will run from the end of August until early October, with the exhibits on show in November. Pictured are ICAD managing director Elaine McDevitt and institute president Jake Walshe from Screen Scene.

Composer John Walsh's Symphonic orchestral scores are making themselves heard these days. Walsh went home with a bell from the ICAD creative advertising and design awards show for Fáilte Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way campaign. Walsh, inset, has created soundtracks for Guinness, Tourism Ireland, Heineken, the Olympics and the Empire Movie Awards.

Overseas clients include Shell in the Gulf region for JWT Dubai and Doha Bank. The Cavan man has another side to his musical talent. As a member of pop group The Carnival Brothers, his song 'The Sun is Gonna Shine' features in a TV ad in the US for HomeAdvisor.

A Coyne Research survey for gas supplier Calor says 72pc of rural dwellers interviewed said keeping in contact with elderly neighbours matters to them, while 49pc could like to see more community events. But there appears to be an urban/rural divide. 63pc of those living outside cities and towns want to know their neighbours, as opposed to 55pc of urban dwellers. Calor's head of marketing Elizabeth Ivory says the findings coincide with its company's sponsorship of the Know Your Neighbour campaign run by Macra na Feirme and the Young Farmers Club of Ulster.

Michael Cullen is editor of Marketing.ie: cullen@marketing.ie

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