Sunday 25 September 2016

Ad industry is on the up

Published 07/01/2016 | 02:30

Tania Banotti, CEO of IAPI
Tania Banotti, CEO of IAPI
Gemma Teeling
Tim Bell

A report by adland's industry body on the year that was shows the economic tide seems to have turned and there's reason to be cautiously optimistic about 2016.

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The Institute of Advertising Practitioners in Ireland (IAPI) now has 50 members with 1,486 employees. Simply Zesty and Core Media signed up as new subscribers this year.

Events in 2015 resulted in 1,575 attendances, up 44pc on 2014. IAPI events include the Doyenne award to honour talented and influential women in adland. This year's winner was PHD's Gemma Teeling.

Despite cries of sexism from some quarters, advocates defend the award as a way of trying to right the dire gender balance among top management in agencies.

IAPI signed up to the annual Cannes Lions Festival. A competition was held which saw four young people from agencies being jetted off to the French Riviera to experience the world's top creative festival at close quarters. A record 59 delegates from Ireland attended and €25k was spent on a Cannes microsite. IAPI chief executive Tania Banotti (main picture) wrote festival reports for the Irish Independent.

Rothco brought home took a bronze Lion in the crisis communications and issues management category for its 'Shred of Decency' campaign in support of the Yes side in the marriage equality referendum. Submissions for IAPI/AAI CopyClear were up by 19pc year on year. Events during the year included Inspire sessions, The Big Grill and Futureheads.

IAPI's Rant Night has become a regular IAPI gig. Agency folk take to the stage in the Sugar Club to let off some steam and talk candidly about issues niggling them. This year, saw former Chemistry director Fintan Cooney describe his new lease of life since swopping the frenetic world of advertising for a funeral director's role with Fanagans.

Hearing adlanders rant came fourth in a list of top five IAPI events. Ping Pong agency wars got the biggest vote with a 28pc rating - 277 people attending, followed by a seminar on the value of advertising run jointly with TAM on 25pc, and Future Foundation in third spot with 22pc. Rant Night scored 14pc and Cannesalysis - a look back on the Lions - was on 11pc.

Boys and Girls got the prize as the agency whose people attended most events, followed by DDFH&B, Rothco, McCannBlue, Publicis, Radical, Chemistry, Javelin, In the Company of Huskies and Target McConnells. DDFH&B Group's Reputations Agency is hired by IAPI to handle its PR. Based on last year's coverage, the total media value was put at just over €1m.

Q It has long been said by marketers that top brands promote stakeholder preference, business performance and help drive shareholder value. For the first time UK valuation and strategy agency Brand Finance (BF) has taken a look back at the share price of the brands it has analysed and their stock market performance since 2007, indicating a link between the two.

An investment strategy by the top brand owners led to a return almost double that of the average Standard & Poor's 500 stock market index. The average return across the S&P was 49pc. Using BF data, investors could have returns of up to 97pc. Investing in companies with a brand value to enterprise value (BV/EV) ratio of over 30pc can yield 94pc returns. Investing only in the 10 companies with the highest BV/EV ratios has a 96pc return.

Q Spin doctor extraordinary and long-time adman Tim Bell (pictured) became almost as well known for his work for Britain's Conservative Party as Alastair Campbell, inset, did for New Labour leader Tony Blair. In Danny Rogers's new book, 'Campaigns That Shook the World', Bell explains his background.

"When I started working for the Conservative Party (1978), I was an outsider because I came from the advertising industry - which to the politicians in the '70s seemed like the rock music industry with added insanity." And there was his mother believing for all those years he held down a respectable job as a piano player in a brothel.

Michael Cullen is editor of Marketing.ie; cullen@marketing.ie

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