Monday 1 May 2017

Half of all jobs will be obsolete by 2030, inaugural tech summit told

Aurelien D’Aquino looks at a humanoid robot called Robothespian at the Dublin Tech Summit
Aurelien D’Aquino looks at a humanoid robot called Robothespian at the Dublin Tech Summit
Smashing Pumpkins drummer Jimmy Chamberlin at the Dublin Tech Summit 2017
Anton Savage at the Dublin Tech Summit 2017 at the Convention Centre

Sean Duffy

Ireland's importance as a technology hub was underlined yesterday as 10,000 people flocked to the inaugural Dublin Tech Summit to learn from leading lights in the industry.

The big theme was staying relevant in an era in which technology threatens to disrupt traditional business models in everything from banking to shoe sales. The implications are stark - including potentially making half of all jobs obsolete.

Organisers DTS told the Irish Independent that there were 10,000 people at the conference, 48pc of them female.

More than half of the delegates came from overseas, eager to gain insights from executives from leading firms such as Google, Intel, Microsoft, PayPal, Accenture, Adobe, Facebook, HPE, HubSpot and Salesforce.

Highlights included Smashing Pumpkins drummer Jimmy Chamberlin discussing the link between tech and the arts with Pixar veteran Matthew Luhn.

Mr Chamberlin has also moonlighted as ceo of LiveOne, a media company that focuses on audience engagement.

Gina London, an Emmy award-winning veteran CNN anchor at the Dublin Tech Summit 2017 at the Convention Centre
Gina London, an Emmy award-winning veteran CNN anchor at the Dublin Tech Summit 2017 at the Convention Centre

"The environment in which content is consumed is every bit as important as the content itself," he said.

Mr Luhn said that long-term thinking that embraced a specific set of values was the best recipe for success in the tech sector.

Accenture's global head of research and development, Marc Carrel-Billiard, introduced the audience to the world's first beer created by artificial intelligence.

Technology is offering people the capacity to tailor their business and social lives in ways that were previously unimaginable, he said.

Creativity expert Ben Jones infused a dystopian view of the future with what he views as humanity's best hope to survive the impending upheaval.

"Half of the jobs that are around today won't exist by 2030. It's going to get worse. Or maybe it will get better. These jobs that are being created today are already defunct. Technology will not drive our success - honesty will," Mr Jones said. "The new world is going to be about augmented creativity.

"We need to believe in our children. It's through them that the creativity will come through.

"The people who get ahead in the world of creativity are the people who refuse to follow the f***ing rules", he added.

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