Tuesday 17 October 2017

Youth unemployed falls marginally but remains above 14pc

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for persons aged 15-24 years in Ireland was 14.8pc in September (Stock image)
The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for persons aged 15-24 years in Ireland was 14.8pc in September (Stock image)
Ellie Donnelly

Ellie Donnelly

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for persons aged 15-24 years in Ireland was 14.8pc in September, a decrease from 15.3pc in August, according to the latest data from the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

This is slightly below the average youth unemployment rate in the European Union of 16.7pc as at 31 August.

Germany recorded the lowest youth unemployment in the European Union at 6.4pc in August, while Greece the highest at 43.4pc, according to data from Eurostat.

Overall, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in Ireland last month was 6.1pc, unchanged from August, and down from 7.5pc in September 2016.

Read more: Jobless figure lowest since 2008

The seasonally adjusted number of persons unemployed was 133,200 in September, down from 133,400 when compared to the August figure, and a decrease of 31,600 when compared to September 2016.

Breaking it down by gender, in September the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 6.8pc for males, down from 7pc in August, and down from 8.6pc in September 2016.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for females in September was 5.1pc, up from 5pc in August, and down from 6.2pc year-on-year.

Commenting on the latest unemployment numbers, Mariano Mamertino, economist at jobs recruitment site Indeed, said that the data provides continuing evidence of the tighter Irish labour market, making it all the more important to attract highly qualified immigrants to address skill shortages in the economy.

"CSO data published last week shows that 64pc of immigrants coming to Ireland have a third-level qualification, while only 44pc of those leaving do.

This suggests a welcome 'brain gain' as Ireland’s position as one of the fastest growing economies in Europe can attract highly educated candidates for available jobs," Mr Mamertino said.

Online Editors

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