Thursday 23 February 2017

Workers rack up 213,000 volunteer hours for charities in 2015

Michael Cogley

Michael Cogley

Euro notes are spread out at a bank branch in Madrid...Euro notes are spread out at a bank branch in Madrid January 13, 2011. Spain and Italy staged successful bond sales on Thursday, buying European leaders a little time to come up with a new package of measures to stem the debt crisis rocking their 12-year old single currency bloc. A day after Portugal surprised many in the markets by selling 10-year debt relatively easily, Spain and Italy passed their first major financial tests of 2011, auctioning a total of 9 billion euros in bonds. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)...I
Euro notes are spread out at a bank branch in Madrid...Euro notes are spread out at a bank branch in Madrid January 13, 2011. Spain and Italy staged successful bond sales on Thursday, buying European leaders a little time to come up with a new package of measures to stem the debt crisis rocking their 12-year old single currency bloc. A day after Portugal surprised many in the markets by selling 10-year debt relatively easily, Spain and Italy passed their first major financial tests of 2011, auctioning a total of 9 billion euros in bonds. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS)...I

Companies in Ireland contributed over €27m to charities and community groups last year while employees racked up 213,000 volunteer hours, new research has shown.

Intel Ireland had the highest number of volunteer hours contributed by employees with ESB, Eir, IBM, and KPMG making up the top five.

In terms of cash donations the ESB Group donated the most, followed by the likes of Tesco Ireland, SSE Airtricity, A&L Goodbody and Vodafone Ireland.

The data was collated by Business in the Community Ireland (BITCI), a network encouraging corporate social responsibility, which showed 51 firms in Ireland have formed more than 7,200 community links and have contributed through cash donations, in-kind donations and employee fundraising.

Intel's donations came prior to the announcement it was cutting jobs in Ireland.

Over 400 jobs could be lost at the tech giant's plant in Leixlip as part of a global culling in which it is redirecting its business.

Nationally, over €11.3m was given in cash donations, €10.5m was contributed through in-kind donations with almost €5.3m raised through employee fundraising.

Business in the Community Ireland chief executive Tina Roche described employees as "heroes".

"They volunteered over 213,000 hours in just one year alone and we see this increasing all the time. The big trend is utilising professional skills to help local causes and this benefits the charities but crucially is engaging employees and boosting morale," she said.

The figures for 2015 represent an increase on 2014 where employee hours amounted to 210,000 and the amount contributed reached €22m.

The areas of health, community and poverty were the best supported. Over €7m was donated to health with a further €4.8m being donated to communities and another €4.1m going towards aiding poverty.

Elsewhere, education and children and youth received sizeable contributions.

More than €2.7m was donated to education while another €2.2m was donated to children and youth.

Dublin generated the most support in the country, raising just under €18m. Outside of Dublin, Kildare raised the most with €2.2m. BITCI said the donations from Kildare was primarily due to Intel.

BITCI said prospective employees consider company culture and engagement when they are looking for a job. The business network said the quality of the corporate social responsibility programme (CSR) weighs on workers' decisions on whether to stay in a job.

CSR is defined by the European Commission as "the responsibility of enterprises for their impacts on society".

The definition is broad and so too is its applications. In Ireland, part of Ulster Bank's CSR programme involves teaching skills for its customers and communities to adapt to changing economies. A firm's involvement with causes ranks high among millennial employees when they're applying for a job, with a recent report, titled 'The Millennial Impact', citing it above office environment and diversity.

BITCI said more and more workers want to work with companies that hold values similar to their own and that and expectancy is growing among the workforce that firms should engage with community groups as standard.

Irish Independent

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