Saturday 1 October 2016

Women to the fore as Irish directors take top spots

Published 16/03/2016 | 02:30

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth is shown chocolate products by the Dublin-born president of Mars global food, drinks and Europan sales, Fiona Dawson, during a visit to Mars Chocolate UK in Slough. Photo: AFP/Getty Images
Britain’s Queen Elizabeth is shown chocolate products by the Dublin-born president of Mars global food, drinks and Europan sales, Fiona Dawson, during a visit to Mars Chocolate UK in Slough. Photo: AFP/Getty Images

The number of Irish directors of UK firms has reached an all time high and one in three Irish directors in the UK are now female.

  • Go To

The Foreign Directors report by communications agency Eulogy, which was formally launched at the Irish Embassy in London last night, had recorded a 13pc growth in Irish directors of UK firms since last year.

Irish nationals remain the largest proportion of non British nationals leading UK based companies, with some 60,892 Irish directors in the UK heading more than 16,000 companies.

Joining Ireland in the top five foreign directors are Germany, America, India and Poland.

Adrian Brady, CEO of Eulogy, said the surpassing of the 60,000 threshold indicated the continued positive impact of Irish directors on the UK economy and said that the number of Irish women on UK boards was beating every other nationality.

"The tremendous 17pc growth in Irish women in UK boards sets a strong example as gender diversity remains firmly at the top of the agenda for businesses in Britain," said Mr Brady.

"Our report demonstrates the dear value of migration in driving success and provides significant food for thought during this pivotal time for Europe".

Mr Brady added that although Brexit had not formed part of its research, many Irish directors the firm had spoken to expressed concerns about the impact of any split by Britain on open borders, free trade and services.

The report, outlining strong growth of directors in areas such as tech, services and retail, raises questions that Ireland could be exposed to a brain drain of creative talent from Ireland to the UK as talent migrates there.

Irish Independent

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Business