Tuesday 6 December 2016

Sheer volume of survey data can render it useless

Published 22/04/2010 | 05:00

THE volume of data generated by radio's quarterly listenership survey is so immense the results run the risk of being of "no particular use to anybody", Mindshare boss David Sneddon has warned.

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The comments came after Sneddon addressed a gathering of more than 100 radio owners and executives at the Independent Broadcasters' of Ireland (IBI) annual conference.

The gathering also heard the secrets of recessionary marketing from DDFH&B strategic planner Amy Mitchell, while Bee Gees member Robin Gibbs was on hand by video link to talk about music rights in the digital age.

During his presentation, Sneddon said the volume of data generated by the JNLR surveys was so great "clients never really know what to make of them [the figures]". "You can use the results to make any case, so it's not necessarily a currency that has any weight," Sneddon added after the event. "No-one's getting anything particularly useful."

The media agency boss believes radio stations need to "standardise" the way they present the results, agreeing which measures are more important and all reporting their figures on that basis alone.

Sneddon also called on radio stations to expand their horizons beyond listnership by collecting data on the number of texts they receive and their online activity so brands can get a better idea of "the role radio plays in people's lives".

DDFH&B's Mitchell used her slots to tell the radio bosses how some international companies had successfully repositioned their brands to deal with more challenging market places.

Hyundai is apparently running a "lose your income, return your car" campaign, Telefonica in Spain has "lose your job, halve your phone bill" and Levi's in India is letting people buy their jeans over three instalments.

"People have to find their value voice, the Harvey Norman [approach] isn't for everyone," Mitchell added, encouraging brands to use the recession to position themselves as activists, optimists, pragmatists and inspirations.

Irish Independent

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