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Friday 9 December 2016

RPS pays dividend of €35m to parent Brown says euro is facing major crisis Roaming prices still too high, says EC NIB signals change of Irish strategy Regulator defends inaction on RBS

ENGINEERING EUROPE TELECOMS FINANCE REGULATION

Published 09/12/2010 | 05:00

RPS Group, the engineering company that advised the Government on the Poolbeg incinerator and Shell on the Mayo gas pipeline, paid a €35m dividend to its UK parent last year. The Irish subsidiary of RPS plc made a pre-tax profit of €4.8m, down almost a half from €9m the previous year. Irish sales dropped from €117m to €90m.

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Brown says euro is facing major crisis

FORMER British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has said he fears the euro will face a "high noon" moment of "major crisis" early in the new year. He told the BBC the euro's problems were bigger than its governments' debts and that Europe had to deal with the enormous debts of its banks.

Roaming prices still too high, says EC

THE European Commission has said mobile phone roaming charges are still too high in the EU and that efforts should be made to make them almost disappear. It has set a ceiling for roaming charges within the 27-nation EU. But the commission said operators "maintain unjustifiably high margins on roaming".

NIB signals change of Irish strategy

THE chief executive of Danske Bank, which bought National Irish Bank (NIB) in 2004, has said it is changing strategy in Ireland to focus on wealthy and corporate customers. "We are pulling back from traditional mass banking when it comes to branches," Peter Straarup said. Danske, Denmark's biggest financial institution, has already closed half of NIB's branches.

Regulator defends inaction on RBS

THE regulator of the City of London yesterday defended his decision to take no action against bosses at Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), which was nationalised by the last British government. Adair Turner, who is the chairman of the Financial Services Authority (FSA), wrote in the 'Financial Times' that RBS chief executive Sir Fred Goodwin and his team had made bad decisions but had not broken any rules. He said new rules were needed to punish bankers who take too many risks.

Irish Independent

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