Thursday 29 September 2016

Professional job vacancies rise 14pc but number of job-seekers drops

Published 12/11/2014 | 02:30

The survey found that the number of job-seekers, at 6,795, fell 8pc in October compared to the previous month.
The survey found that the number of job-seekers, at 6,795, fell 8pc in October compared to the previous month.

Professional job vacancies rose 14pc last month compared to the same month last year, a survey has found.

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Vacancies continue to rise on a month-on-month basis, with a 5pc jump in October compared to September, according to the latest employment monitor from Morgan McKinley. Employment is up across all sectors and professional jobs are opening up at a faster pace than other sectors.

Bryan Hyland, Morgan McKinley's operational director, said that for the sixth month in a row professional job vacancies are up, reflecting an improving economy.

"Indeed, while all employment indicators - such as the Live Register and Quarterly National Household Survey - are showing an increase in employment, the growth in professional jobs is actually outstripping all other areas," Mr Hyland said.

The survey found that the number of job-seekers, at 6,795, fell 8pc in October compared to the previous month.

The number is down 27pc compared with the same period last year.

It also found that there was a shift in focus in financial services firms, which previously had put resources into recruiting for their arrears and collections functions.

There is now a shift towards hiring professionals in product development and sales roles.

"This is a prime example of firms looking to generate revenue in attracting new business and speaks well of the rising confidence in the Irish economy," Mr Hyland added.

"The changing role of accountants provides further evidence of this rising belief in economic prospects.

"The results of the Monitor have shown finance professionals with a strong commercial and strategic background are in high demand.

"The drop in the number of job-seekers is a continuation of trends we have seen in recent months."

Irish Independent

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