Sunday 4 December 2016

Permission given for seven-storey hotel on Moore Street Rising site

An Bord Pleanala refuses appeals from An Taisce and Save Moore Street Committee, writes Paul O'Donoghue

Paul O'Donoghue

Published 10/01/2016 | 02:30

Last week, workers on the site were forced to down tools after protesters entered into
14-17 Moore Street and expressed their concerns about several protected structures on the terrace being damaged as a result of demolition work. Photo: PA
Last week, workers on the site were forced to down tools after protesters entered into 14-17 Moore Street and expressed their concerns about several protected structures on the terrace being damaged as a result of demolition work. Photo: PA

An Bord Pleanala has given the green light for the development of a hotel on the historic Moore Street site in Dublin city centre.

  • Go To

Developer Kendlebell Mid-West submitted plans for the 107-bedroom seven-storey project in January. The hotel is to run over two sites, one on Moore Street and the other on Moore Lane, and will include a stand-alone bar and restaurant. Most of the bedrooms in the seven-storey building will oversee Moore Lane, while a small number will face onto Moore Street.

Dublin City Council had initially approved the project in July, however, its decision was then appealed by a number of organisations opposed to the development.

Both An Taisce, the national trust for Ireland, and the Save Moore Street Committee lodged appeals against the decision, claiming that the history of the site had not been taken into account. No 16 Moore Street was the last site held by rebels during the 1916 Easter Rising before they surrendered to the British forces.

Nos 14-17 Moore Street was declared a national monument in 2007 and was acquired by the State for €4m in March 2015. Although the Government plans to restore the fronts of 14-17 and open a commemorative centre and museum, buildings on either side of the national monument are to be demolished as part of the restoration works. There have been calls to preserve the entire terrace.

The appeal from the Save Moore Street Committee said there was no reference in the council's original decision to a statement by the National Museum that "the site is the most important historic site in modern Irish history". It claimed that the hotel would "tower over and obscure these significant sites".

It added that to date there had been no independent battlefield survey of the area and that until Dublin City Council carried out a survey of the Moore Street area "any planning application to develop this historic area is premature and contrary to the public interest".

In its appeal, An Taisce claimed that the proposed seven-storey height "is excessive".

It added: "The appropriate response for a new building on this site is a step-down between the Jury's Inn adjoining to the west and Conway's pub adjoining to the east, ie a five- to six-storey height."

However An Bord Pleanala decided to grant permission for the hotel, which it said complied with building standards. It inspector Dolores McCague said: "It is considered that the proposed development would not unduly impact on the adjacent protected structures and would otherwise be in accordance with the proper planning and sustainable development of the area."

Approval for the hotel is subject to certain conditions, such as the developer working with an archaeologist during construction in case any historic material is found.

Last week, workers on the site were forced to down tools after protesters entered into 14-17 Moore Street and expressed their concerns about several protected structures on the terrace being damaged as a result of demolition work.

Sunday Indo Business

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Business