Monday 26 September 2016

One in five works extra three months each year for free

Anne-Marie Walsh

Published 15/03/2016 | 02:30

Picture posed
Picture posed

Many Irish employees are working an extra three months a year for free as they spend more hours in their workplace most days.

  • Go To

A new survey of working hours reveals that nearly three- quarters of staff are doing more than their contracted hours.

And one in five work an extra three months a year, according to a Morgan McKinley survey.

Just two extra hours a day adds up to 10 hours a week, 520 hours a year - or 13 weeks over a year, the study points out. Despite advances in technology allowing people to work from home, many are staying in the office for longer. And more than four out of every five workers said they did not get any compensation for the extra time at their desks.

Morgan McKinley's Director of Inward Investment, Trayc Keevans, said the findings suggested a culture of longer working hours has become established among professional staff over the past two years.

"Over 40pc of professionals are now working at least six hours extra a week, and nearly one in every five employees is putting in 10 hours extra or more per week - that is a full extra quarter for these employees per year," she said.

Motivated

"It's clear that the Irish economy and the professional workforce has a cohort of highly motivated and committed employees who are prepared to go the extra mile for their companies and their careers."

She said employers who are conscious of the need to limit "salary inflation", should consider the benefits of offering flexible work arrangements to attract and retain talent.

Ms Keevans said most of those surveyed felt obliged to work longer than they were paid for, although most of them did not get any extra compensation in terms of time in lieu or overtime for their efforts.

However, 43pc felt they are more productive during the extra hours, because there was less disruption in the form of phonecalls and email.

She said flexible work arrangements are a key aspiration for workers, with almost half saying this would improve their working lives.

The majority of those surveyed indicated flexible and remote working arrangements are offered on a discretionary and occasional basis rather than as part of an overall defined package.

Over a third of workers said they have the option of working from home but only 4pc said working outside the office was formally offered as part of company policy.

Irish Independent

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Business