Sunday 25 September 2016

Leprechauns, planes, and even Soviet Russia: the reaction

Published 13/07/2016 | 02:30

'Leprechaun economics: Ireland reports 26pc growth! But it doesn’t make sense. Why are these in GDP?' Paul Krugman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist. Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images
'Leprechaun economics: Ireland reports 26pc growth! But it doesn’t make sense. Why are these in GDP?' Paul Krugman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist. Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images

"Leprechaun economics: Ireland reports 26pc growth! But it doesn't make sense. Why are these in GDP?" Paul Krugman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist.

  • Go To

"The reputation of the State as a place with a stable business environment must be protected. Unexpected swings of this magnitude are not always helpful."

Michael Noonan
Michael Noonan

FF Finance spokesman Michael McGrath.

 

"I don't know if even Soviet Russia in the 1930s exceeded these figures."

Tom Healy, director of the Nevin Economic Research Institute.

Marie Sherlock
Marie Sherlock

 

"If the media want to go find this growth, they might as well go plane-watching at Dublin airport."

Aidan Regan, assistant professor in the School of Politics and International Relations at UCD.

 

"People's lives are improving, with more at work than at any time since the onset of the downturn. We no longer need to impose swingeing cuts to public services, rather we have room to invest."

Finance Minister Michael Noonan.

 

"The Government must maximise this opportunity and use the additional available fiscal space for much needed investment into housing and other social and economic infrastructure in 2017."

SIPTU economist Marie Sherlock.

 

"I would be exceptionally cautious about translating that degree of economic growth into budget choices that we are going to make for 2017."

Public Expenditure and Reform Minister Paschal Donohoe.

 

"It is irrelevant. It does not reflect any sort of reality as to how the economy is faring."

Sinn Féin Finance spokesman Pearse Doherty.

 

"f a release of statistical data brings about a question of trust in that data, then the credibility question definitely comes up."

Dermot O'Leary, chief economist at Goodbody Stockbrokers.

 

"We are a very small economy and if we get a big increase in assets, this is what happens."

Michael Connolly of the CSO.

Irish Independent

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Business