Business Irish

Wednesday 18 October 2017

Job plan 'delayed until next year'

NEW laws shaking up the state support structure for local businesses won't be drawn-up until next year -- despite being promised in February. Under the action plan on jobs, the Government promised that the county and city enterprise boards would be dissolved and a new micro-enterprise and small business unit created within Enterprise Ireland. It would work with local authorities to establish a network of local enterprise offices.

Editorial shake-up at the 'Irish Mail'

THE editor of the 'Irish Mail on Sunday' is to become editor-in-chief of Associated Newspapers Ireland. Sebastian Hamilton will take over the post from Eric Bailey, who will step down in January. Conor O'Donnell, currently editor of the 'Irish Daily Mail', will take the helm of the Sunday edition.

PTSB has crucial role, says Noonan

Michael Noonan has said state-owned Permanent TSB has an "important role in the future of Irish banking" alongside the so-called pillar banks. The news comes as the bailed-out lender made two new senior appointments. The Central Bank has approved the appointments of Brendan Lynott as distribution director and David Curtis as customer credit director of Permanent TSB.

Europe's women quota plan stalls

European Union plans to set a 40pc quota for women on company supervisory boards by 2020 stalled after EU commissioners failed to agree on the measures at a meeting yesterday. The European Commission's legal service warned that a binding quota for women may be illegal ahead of the meeting. Lawyers said EU regulators don't have the right to mandate binding targets for results obtained by firms, said a source. EU rules can require companies to make efforts toward a target.

Walbrook Capital not criticised

A headline in the business section on October 23 incorrectly stated that a new shareholder in Nama's SPV has previously been "heavily criticised" by the UK regulator. We are happy to clarify that neither Walbrook Capital or its predecessor C12 were criticised by the regulator. Criticism in relation to the "Protium" transaction was levelled at Barclays Capital, the other party to the deal.

Irish Independent

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