Business Irish

Monday 24 July 2017

Irish women in the UK now earn 17.5pc more than men

The UK report into the gender gap across different ethnic groups found that Irish women in Britain were the only group to earn more than men. Photo: PA
The UK report into the gender gap across different ethnic groups found that Irish women in Britain were the only group to earn more than men. Photo: PA

Sean Duffy

Irish women in the UK earn more than men on average, according to a new report.

The UK report into the gender gap across different ethnic groups found that Irish women in Britain were the only group to earn more than men.

The study released yesterday by the Fawcett Society in conjunction with Manchester University, studied the gender pay gaps of women from different ethnicities including Irish, white British, Chinese, Indian, black African as well as Pakistani and Bangladeshi.

On average, the study shows Irish women in full-time employment in the UK earn 17.5pc more than British men working full time, and 3.7pc more than Irish men based in the UK.

This is because Irish women in the UK tend to be an older demographic and are thus likely to be in more senior positions within their organisations, the report stated.

Meanwhile, the Irish Central Bank here has urged financial firms to hire more women to senior management roles.

Repeal the Eighth protesters gather on O’Connell Bridge in Dublin. Photo: Gerry Mooney
Repeal the Eighth protesters gather on O’Connell Bridge in Dublin. Photo: Gerry Mooney

It said that men made up 80pc of the applications for approvals to serve in senior management roles at Irish financial firms since 2012.

The Bank said it "is concerned regarding the continued evidence of a lack of diversity at the most senior levels of regulated firms".

"There is a strong body of research, including research undertaken by Central Bank staff, that a lack of diversity increases the risks of groupthink, poor decision-making and cultural issues in firms," Ed Sibley, director of credit Institutions Supervision, said.

Irish Independent

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