Business Irish

Friday 19 September 2014

Intel moves to allay job loss fears as 600 workers called home from US training trip

Niall O’Connor

Published 09/11/2012 | 12:29

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INTEL has moved to allay fears of job losses at its Kildare plant after 600 workers were called home from a US training trip.

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The staff recall had led to speculation that production of a new product at its Irish plant was to be delayed.

The fears surfaced after the company dramatically ended a US training trip involving a group of Irish staff.

But the firm today moved to allay fears of job losses, claiming that it still intends to launch the product at its Kildare factory.

A spokesperson said that the company's “overall plans” had not changed.

“We regularly make adjustments to our factory workforce to optimise the talent we have available, wherever the need arises and dependent on economic condition,” the spokesperson added.

The workers, employed by Intel, are being sent home from US training following delays surrounding the new product, a microchip.

It's understood that staff being trained in New Mexico and Arizona will now return to Ireland in December.

Many of those affected were originally told that they could be required to remain in the US until the middle of 2013.

The staff in question were sent to the US to learn how to use a new type of technology that was expected to be produced in Ireland in the future.

However Intel bosses are understood to have made the decision to send the staff home early after a slowdown in demand for the product.

Intel Ireland employs over 4,000 people with its campus based in Leixlip.

The news however is understood to have sparked concern among some employees about the long-term future of their positions.

The Leixlip facility was given a major boost earlier this year when it was announced that it was one of three campuses that would be chosen to produce a new nanometer microchip - known as the “1272 process”.

It prompted bosses there to order the refitting of the plants in order to ensure that they are ready to manufacture the new technology.

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