Thursday 8 December 2016

Gardaí may be asked to investigate IBRC leak

Donal O'Donovan and Philip Ryan

Published 06/06/2015 | 02:30

Businessman Denis O'Brien has stated that documents related to his private relationship with the bank were 'stolen' from IBRC. Photo: Ramin Talaie/Bloomberg
Businessman Denis O'Brien has stated that documents related to his private relationship with the bank were 'stolen' from IBRC. Photo: Ramin Talaie/Bloomberg

GardaÍ may be called to investigate the leak of confidential data at the centre of the storm over businessman Denis O'Brien's banking relationship with IBRC.

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IBRC's Special Liquidators Kieran Wallace and Eamonn Richardson, the KMPG partners who took control of the former bank in 2013, may escalate their internal probe into the leak.

"The Special Liquidators are following a definite line of inquiry concerning the removal of documents and the leaking of information about a specific customer account from IBRC," a spokesman said.

"The Special Liquidators have sought and received advice to the effect that they should conclude their current internal inquiries before initiating any further action. Such further action may include informing the appropriate authorities, including the Gardaí."

The possibility of a criminal investigation is the latest twist in the row over documents which has become a huge political and legal controversy.

Mr O'Brien has stated that documents related to his private relationship with the bank were "stolen" from IBRC, subsequently tampered with, and information circulated to RTÉ and Catherine Murphy TD.

Mr O'Brien successfully applied to the High Court to prevent an RTÉ report. However, parts of the same or similar files were subsequently included in a Dáil speech by Ms Murphy. Reporting of that speech was not subject to the Court injunction.

Mr O'Brien's High Court petition was supported by IBRC's Special Liquidators, whose lawyer said the case had already been referred to the Data Protection Commissioner.

Meanwhile, Fianna Fáil wants the IBRC Commission of Investigation to report by October.

It is also insisting the commission should investigate the circumstances surrounding the IBRC board meeting minutes mislaid by the Department of Finance.

Irish Independent

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