Monday 26 June 2017

Female graduates expect to earn €8,000 less than men

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Global brands Disney and L'Oreal are among the most coveted employers for female business students, but don't feature among the top picks for males. In contrast, sports and betting firms Nike and Padd

Daniel McDonald and Colm Kelpie

Girls love Disney and boys want to work for Paddy Power, at least according to a major survey of 10,000 Irish students aged 21 on average.

Male 21-year-olds expect a starting salary €8,000 higher then their female contemporaries, according to new research, exclusively published by the Irish Independent.

Pay expectations aren't the only difference between the sexes. Google and Apple maintain their positions as the most desirable employers for business, engineering and IT students, capitalising on the perception of staff-friendly environments.

But there are some striking differences between male and female students when it comes to other sought-after jobs.

Global brands Disney and L'Oreal are among the most coveted employers for female business students, but don't feature among the top picks for males.

In contrast, sports and betting firms Nike and Paddy Power, as well as Guinness maker Diageo, are among the top picks for males.

Regardless of where they take up work, most 21-year-old women expect to earn around €37,000 in their first graduate job. Men the same age anticipate earning €45,000.

The results are based on a survey of more than 10,000 Irish students carried out between October 2014 and February 2015 by branding consultancy firm Universum.

Unsurprisingly, for the generation that came of age during the financial crash, both genders see job security as the top priority as they look to move into the workforce.

Majorities of students in business, engineering and IT courses said that the prospect of secure and stable employment was their main concern when seeking graduate employment.

There has been a corresponding decline in the number of undergraduates whose career priority is to work for a cause or seek to serve a greater good in their professional lives.

Balancing work and personal life remains a priority for graduates, the results show. The so-called "Google effect" means young people now value a positive working environment more than ever, Universum said.

At 38pc, well under half of those surveyed are considering emigration.

Long-term career prospects are a priority for young people, with half of respondents aspiring to have a job which will lead them to higher future earnings.

The result could point to the beginning of the end for the "tech bubble", according to Universum. Oracle fell 20 places to 57th on the list of most desirable employers for business students. Dell, IBM, HP and EMC all dropped more than 15 positions each.

Business students continue to favour KPMG among the Big Four auditors, though Deloitte advances to just two places behind at number eight.

Across all disciplines and both sexes,  Diageo narrowly beats Jameson to the number 10 spot, while Aer Lingus comes out ahead of Ryanair.

Irish Independent

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