Friday 28 July 2017

Do you believe schools are providing your children with the necessary digital skills?

Only one third of respondents feel that these schools have access to the appropriate equipment Stock Image
Only one third of respondents feel that these schools have access to the appropriate equipment Stock Image
Louise Kelly

Louise Kelly

Half of the people in Ireland believe that the Irish education system is worse than their European counterparts when it comes to digital tech skills and training.

According to a survey carried out by Ricoh Ireland, just 29pc of Irish people are confident that schools are providing children with the necessary digital development.

Furthermore, only one third of respondents feel that these schools have access to the appropriate equipment that will allow students to become digitally proficient.

While the perception of Irish third-level education fares better - 64pc of people are of the belief that graduates are digitally prepared to enter the workplace - half of those surveyed still maintain that the education system here lags behind its European counterparts. 

"It’s no exaggeration to say that digital skills are becoming as essential as reading and writing and our education bodies need to reflect that in their syllabuses," Chas Moloney, Director, Ricoh Ireland & UK, said.

"Children need to learn digital skills from a very young age and that must progress right through their journey in the education system. These are the people that are going to be driving our economy in years to come and we must ensure that they have the skills they need to do that."

Employers are under more pressure than ever to provide digital training for their staff, the survey revealed, with only half (49pc) of office workers content with the development their boss is providing in this area.

This negative impact of this is represented by the whopping 41pc of respondents who said they would leave their job for another if it offered better digital skills development opportunities - despite the fact that 70pc are confident that their employer understands the role technology can play in employee well-being.

"The younger generations in today’s workforce want to have access to the latest technology and use it in a way that works best for them and that enriches their work experience," Mr Moloney added.

"While employers do understand that technology plays a major role in employee satisfaction and well-being, they seem to be integrating it into the workforce with trepidation."

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