Monday 26 September 2016

Ballymaloe's success 'helps dispel corned beef and cabbage myth'

Gordon Deegan

Published 06/05/2016 | 02:30

Ballymaloe director Darina Allen pictured with her daughter-in-law, the well-known TV chef Rachel Allen, at the cookery school, outside Midleton in Co Cork
Ballymaloe director Darina Allen pictured with her daughter-in-law, the well-known TV chef Rachel Allen, at the cookery school, outside Midleton in Co Cork

The numbers of people from abroad taking the prestigious Ballymaloe Cookery School course help to spread the message of good Irish food and dispel the myth that we are just a land of corned beef and cabbage.

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That's according to the director of the school, Darina Allen, who was yesterday commenting on new accounts confirming another bumper year for the business behind the world-renowned school.

The accounts show that the Co Cork-based cookery school made a profit of over €140,000 last year.

The accounts just filed by Ballymaloe Cookery School Ltd with the Companies Office show that its accumulated profits increased from €2.43m to €2.57m in the 12 months to the end of August last.

The company's cash pile during the year increased from €682,350 to €780,109.

Established in 1983, the main driver of the success of the school is its 12-week cookery course that costs entrants €11,395.

The course runs three times every year and if the 60-place event is fully subscribed, it can generate revenues of €2m per year.

Ms Allen said yesterday that the current course is into its second week and there are people from 12 countries attending.

Ms Allen confirmed that there was a waiting list for the current course.

Along with the intensive course, the school offers a range of other courses. The school employs around 55 people and staff costs last year totalled €1.23m.

Irish Independent

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