Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Thursday 19 October 2017

It's National Potato Day 2017 - how do you eat your spuds?

Anna Cummins (9) and Faye Gannon (9) from Slieverue National School, Waterford help launch National Potato Day.
Anna Cummins (9) and Faye Gannon (9) from Slieverue National School, Waterford help launch National Potato Day.
Margaret Donnelly

Margaret Donnelly

Today is National Potato Day - so what better thing to do than find out how best we like to eat our spuds?

Synonymous in Irish history, potatoes were first introduced to Ireland it is thought by the Spanish in the late 1500s, today research from Bord Bia shows that despite challenges from pasta and rice, potatoes remain Irelands most popular carbohydrate food.

In fact, we spent €195m in the last 12 months on potatoes in Ireland, eating a whopping 205,819t. Roosters remain the most popular potato variety in Ireland accounting for 66pc of all sales, which is apt as the Rooster potato was bred by potato experts in Teagasc, Carlow.

Potatoes are a good source of fibre when eaten with their skins on as well as a good source of potassium and an excellent source of vitamin C to support the immune system. They also contain a variety of B vitamins and are a source of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus.

#HaveYourSay: What's your favourite way to eat potatoes?

To celebrate National Potato Day we want to know how you most enjoy the humble spud.

National Potato Day Ambassador and Registered Dietician, Radio and TV Broadcaster, Aoife Hearne says that it may be a surprise to some, but potatoes are the long-standing hero of mine when it comes to carbohydrates.

"Not only are they unprocessed, but eating them with the skin on makes them a good source of fibre in the Irish diet. They’re fat-free, but also gluten-free, meaning they’re a great carbohydrate choice for people with coeliac disease but best of all, they’re delicious!

"Potatoes are part of the carbohydrate family – an essential nutrient for energy and the only energy source readily available for the brain to use. They are a valued part of a balanced and varied diet and just like other macronutrients - protein and fat - it is the quality and quantity of all these nutrients that is important.”

Also Read


Online Editors