Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Wednesday 18 October 2017

RTE's George Lee describes a 'couple of frisky cows in the background' as Chinese delegates visit Irish farm

Visit comes on hopes of lift of Irish beef ban

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and his wife Prof Cheng Hong with Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD at the farm of Cathal Garvey (left of the Taoiseach) from Ower, Co Mayo, yesterday
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and his wife Prof Cheng Hong with Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD at the farm of Cathal Garvey (left of the Taoiseach) from Ower, Co Mayo, yesterday
17/05/2015 . H.E. Mr Li Premier of the State Council, People's Republic of China with AN Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD at the farm of Cathal Garvey from Ower Co. Mayo. Photo: Andrews Downes XPOSURE
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

The circle of life - it stops for nobody.

And so it proved when Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and several Chinese ministers visited a Mayo farm along with Enda Kenny yesterday.

The visit came as Ireland and China signed a diplomatic visa waiver agreement and agreed on greater agricultural co-operation between both countries and hopes that a ban on Irish beef will be lifted.

Read more here: Rain doesn't spoil 'nicest day' for Chinese Premier 

Discussing it on 'Morning Ireland' on RTE Radio One this morning, agriculture and farming correspondent George Lee said the visit was a great success for the Irish government, portraying the beautiful farming landscape of Ireland.

Along with a couple of frisky cows.

"I noticed that when the Chinese media was interviewing the Minister for Agriculture [Simon Coveney], I'm not sure the cameraman would have got this, but there were a couple frisky cows in the background," George told the programme to peals of laughter from the two hosts.

"Well it would be good and viral on our internet here but I'm sure the Chinese cameraman wasn't so canny about that," George added.

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Read more here: Visa waiver deal and agricultural co-operation strengthen Chinese ties  

Chinese Premier Li, the second-in-command in China, was on a two-day visit to Ireland. It follows the lifting of the ban on Irish beef exports in February, paving the way for exporting the Irish produce to a rapidly growing Chinese market.

Those frisky cows aside, George said the visit to the Garvey family farm on the Galway Mayo border, which was covered by the Chinese media, did the Irish farming sector proud.

"So on the farm yesterday, which is the farm of the Garvey family, just on the Galway Mayo border, and it was very important for the Taoiseach to say it was Mayo by the way for the media - we were told on several occasions."

Read more here: Simon Coveney hails China for lifting ban on Irish beef 

And the green green grass of home looked tantalisingly good, according to the RTE correspondent.

"On that farm the image was so bountiful. The grass that those cows were on hadn't been, I'd say,  touched for months. I haven't seen long grass... if you were in any way hungry, you'd might eat it yourself it was that good.

"The cows were so well prepared. Their udders were full down to the grass. The image of the field full of cows I'd say for the Chinese audience and the greenery was absolutely fantastic."

Online Editors