Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Friday 9 December 2016

Ringside offers early reports from marts

Published 23/08/2011 | 05:00

Today, the Farming Independent launches Ringside, a guide to the week's cattle prices, which is based on actual sales data from participating marts.

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This additional service is based on sale prices for cattle, which are averaged across given classes of stock.

The chosen marts provide a good geographic spread, while the breakdown of cattle by breed offers an accurate guide to the price differential between Continental, Friesian and Hereford and Angus entries.

Set out in an easy-to-read format, Ringside gives average prices for bullocks, heifers, weanling bulls and weanling heifers across various weight ranges.

It also provides the averages paid for the top and bottom 25pc of entries in each weight category.

The cattle trade in the marts is on fire at the moment, with exceptional prices paid for stock across all classes.

The trade for forward stores has been particularly strong and mart managers report numbers being offloaded early by farmers keen to take advantage of the buoyancy in the market.

The weanling trade is also getting into full swing, with farmers and shippers competing strongly in the rings.

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Ringside will offer farmers who are considering selling or buying stock a valuable guide to the trade early in the week.

The Farming Independent is grateful for the assistance it has received from participating marts.

Participation in Ringside is open to all of the country's marts and we would appreciate any observations which people may have on the service.

In other news, farming has certainly turned the corner as a course of choice for the nation's students.

This is confirmed by the latest CAO entry-point figures, which show the requirement for agriculture-related college courses increasing for the fourth year in a row.

The points needed for the major agriculture courses went up again, on top of a significant jump that was recorded last year.

The three key courses in UCD -- Animal Science, Agricultural Science and Food Science -- were all up by between 10 and 20 points. It was a same story with Dairy Science in UCC, which saw the cut-off lifting by 30 points to 365.

Forestry in UCD was also a popular choice, with the points increasing from 330 to 360, even though there was an increase in the number of places available.

The growing popularity of agriculture among Leaving Cert students is a positive development for the industry.

Agriculture is viewed as a very diverse and versatile degree and it can only be to the benefit of the industry if it's attracting some of the brightest and best students.

Indo Farming