Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Tuesday 17 January 2017

Looking forward to the same type of summer as last year

Bernard Byrne

Published 04/01/2011 | 05:00

Bernard admits he sells the odd second-hand combine in Ireland, on top of several exported to Morocco and Pakistan, but they are now becoming expensive to buy over here
Bernard admits he sells the odd second-hand combine in Ireland, on top of several exported to Morocco and Pakistan, but they are now becoming expensive to buy over here

"We got on well last year. We sold a lot of second-hand and new combine parts, but I would say that new parts dominated the business," Bernard says.

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"Farmers prefer to buy new if at all possible, rather than buy half-worn parts. That's along with the fact that a lot of farmers have got into better combines and prefer to buy new components for them."

The larger section of Bernard's business is fast-wearing parts.

"We sold a lot of fast-wearing parts, such as rasp-bars, concaves and belts. I suppose anything is fast wearing to do with a combine. We also do a lot of slow-wearing parts such as the likes of elevator chains. Because they are such a job to fit, we find that lads now prefer to fit new elevator chains instead of half-worn ones.

"Parts for New Holland, Deutz-Fahr, Claas and John Deere would be our core business, but every year we upgrade and expand what we are doing and what we sell in the combine parts business, whether it is new knives or fingers. This year we hope to get into more belts."

While Bernard found that there was an export market for older combines last year, this year will be different.

"We sell a few second-hand combines for export every year, mostly to Pakistan and Morocco. That market has its moments though. It could [be] busy one month, nothing the next and busy again the following month, then gone for the year."

He also sells the odd second-hand at home but says second-hand combines are getting expensive to buy.

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"The Irish market is dominated by five-walker combines and these are now scarce in Britain. The likes of a New Holland TX32, 44 or 62 would be very expensive and people can't get the money to buy them."

Also on the negative side, Bernard says: "Fertiliser prices are up and the price of renting land has gone up. So a lot of the profit has already been eroded on corn."

Finishing on a positive note, Bernard says: "We were busy last year and we are looking forward to the same type of summer this year."

Bernard Byrne: 087 225 0538

Indo Farming



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