Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Saturday 21 October 2017

Got any unwanted farm parts to sell? Haybay offers chance to make a buck

Caitriona Murphy

Caitriona Murphy

Two Blarney-based brothers are racing ahead with their online farm sales website, www.haybay.ie.

First launched three years ago, haybay.ie has trebled its visitor numbers each year and now has close to 12,000 visitors a month.

Conceived and designed by farming brothers Maurice and Michael Twomey, the website is a one-stop selling shop for all things agricultural, from tractors and trailers to cattle and parts.

Maurice said haybay, a play on ebay, began as a way of selling their own hay and straw. "I was selling my own hay and straw and my brother, Michael, is the IT man, so he set up the website to sell my own stuff," Maurice said. "Then we sold some bits and pieces for our neighbours and charged a fee for selling it.

Grew

"Gradually it grew out into machinery and livestock and, today, the majority of our customers are repeat business -- people who have sold three or four different things on the site and keep coming back."

Maurice has been on the road for the past three years, calling into various farms to explain about the website and take advertisements.

Comparisons

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"The way I look at it, every yard has four or five things in it that need to go, and haybay.ie is a way of selling them," Maurice said.

"Every farm is a home-based business with a computer or laptop."

Comparisons with other websites, such as www.donedeal.ie, are inevitable but Maurice said haybay.ie is in a niche area, focused only on the farming market, and therefore generates a more interested visitor.

However, expansion is definitely on the horizon, with plans to add a new dimension to the site which will be dedicated to the sale of commercial cattle, called www.cattlemarkets.ie.

Meanwhile, Michael is also working on a project which could be described as 'Skype on a local basis'.

The idea is to allow farmers with access to broadband to talk to each other free of charge using a phone and headset.

Caitriona Murphy

Irish Independent