Farm Ireland

Thursday 27 October 2016

Forging new talent in an age-old craft

Published 20/07/2016 | 02:30

Andy Greyborough, Fife, Scotland in action at the Newbridge Horseshoeing Championships
Andy Greyborough, Fife, Scotland in action at the Newbridge Horseshoeing Championships

FARRIERS from all over England, Scotland and Ireland gathered in Newbridge at the weekend to pit their craft skills against one another.

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Fifty-two competitors took part in the 11th annual Horseshoeing Championships with competition in all classes - including a competition for women farriers which attracted seven entrants. This was won by Hanna Heffernan from nearby Vickerstown, just across the county bounds in Laois.

Eddie Channon's forge at Roseberry, on the edge of Newbridge, in the heart of Kildare's horse sector, was a hive of activity for two days as the entrants worked against the clock and under the eagle eye of expert judges.

Eddie Channon is a master farrier and blacksmith and comes originally from Clonmel but he has been operating around the Curragh of Kildare for the past 25 years. He is the third generation of his family in the business and he is proud that his own son, Ted, is now also carrying on the tradition. His brothers, Joe and Ian, still run the original family forge in the heart of Clonmel. One of the farriers competing, Josh Wilson, from Fife in Scotland, is the eighth generation of his family to follow the trade.

For Eddie, the competition is about maintaining the craft at a high standard and about learning new skills and tricks of the trade. "It's really a learning event where younger apprentices especially can meet the more experienced farriers. It's also a social event - just good craic really," he explains.

The festivities concluded late on Saturday evening with a gala dinner in Lawlor's Hotel in Naas where 65 guests sat down to eat. The event began as a one-day competition with fewer than 20 competitors in 2006.

And yes, Eddie Channon is already working on plans for next year's competition.


* A group of globetrotting seagulls appear to be enjoying a tour of  the country as they decided to make a quick pit-stop on a farm in Garryhill, Co Carlow.

The gulls circled over farmer John Tracey’s freshly ploughed fields before swooping behind the plough to feast on worms.

The quick-thinking farmer spotted tiny metal rings on their legs with numbers and  letters and called a local photographer to take some pictures. They decided to report the young ring bearers to find out exactly where they had journeyed from.

It turns out the gulls are participants from a project in Clyde, Scotland. The life histories of the birds show that one gull, ringed as ‘4Y9’ is a very well travelled/reported individual.

Iain Livingstone, project representative, said one was previously spotted on Horse Isle, an uninhabited island located in the Firth of Clyde, Scotland, in June 2014. He was also enjoyed the winter sun along Malaga Harbour, Spain in December 2014. Three months later he was basking in the rocky, sun-baked region of Andalucia along the Spain’s southern coastline.

The last place  he was spotted was in Oss, a city in the southern Netherlands until making his way across Europe to the Emerald Isle.

Indo Farming