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Saturday 3 December 2016

Careful selection key to control of septoria

Published 22/06/2010 | 05:00

DISCUSSING MATTERS: (from left) Denis Crowley, adviser Ciaran Collins, host farmer John Crowley, Renny, Ballyhooly, Co Cork, and Teagasc area manager Jerry McCarthy check out a crop of JB Diego
winter wheat at the Teagasc BETTER crop walk.
DISCUSSING MATTERS: (from left) Denis Crowley, adviser Ciaran Collins, host farmer John Crowley, Renny, Ballyhooly, Co Cork, and Teagasc area manager Jerry McCarthy check out a crop of JB Diego winter wheat at the Teagasc BETTER crop walk.

Final sprays are going on wheat crops, and controlling septoria is the main target. Fusarium, rusts and mildew also need to be taken into consideration when making product selection.

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Controlling septoria has become more difficult over recent years, with changes in the disease's sensitivity to certain chemical families. Careful product selection with an eye to protecting the effectiveness of the control options currently available is needed by all growers.

Septoria tritici has been resistant to MBC fungicides since the 1980s. Since 2003 it has been resistant to strobilurin fungicides.

A shift in sensitivity to the triazole fungicides, Folicur and Caramba, was detected between 2004 and 2005 by the research team in Oak Park.

Sensitivity to the two most commonly used triazoles, Opus and Proline, remained stable between 2003 and 2008 and both products gave effective septoria control.

Then, in late 2008 and early last year, samples collected from some wheat crops showed reduced sensitivity to Opus and Proline in laboratory tests. The degree of insensitivity was greater for Proline than Opus.

Initial results from field trials indicate that the performance of epoxiconazole and prothioconazole appear to have been affected to some extent.

However, the other triazoles, Folicur and Caramba, were found to be effective against these particular strains of the disease.

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For the reasons outlined above, it's best that triazoles are mixed or alternated with a fungicide with different modes of action to minimise the potential for further shifts in sensitivity.

As an anti-resistance strategy, using Gleam/Prosaro or Caramba/Folicur as the main triazole at T3 is advised. A half-rate of strobilurin may be worthwhile in crops with high yield potential.

The final fungicide should be applied when the crop is starting to head out, targeting mildew and rust.

Rate will depend on the number of days protection required to senescence.

Options include:



  • Furlong 0.5-0.8l/ha + Talius 0.2l/ha (+ Corbel 0.25l/ha where mildew >5pc);
  • Tocata 1-1 .5l/ha;
  • Menara 0.4l/ha + Talius 0.2l/ha +/- Corbel or Tern 0.3 l/ha;
  • Jenton 1.25-1 .5l/ha.


The Crowley farm in North Cork is impressive and most of the visitors to Ballyhooley on Thursday went away with some ideas or advice they could use on their own farms.

The farm has been achieving average winter wheat yields of 10t/ha over recent years and winter barley yields of 8.6t/ha, so they are getting plenty of things right and doing things well to produce these yields across a larger area.

Over 200ha of winter wheat is in the ground this year as wellas a further 180ha of barley between spring and winter barley.

This farm is run by John and Denis Crowley with some additional help at sowing and harvesting time. To manage this with just two labour units means that operations are carried out very efficiently.

The two other BETTER crops farm walks in Wexford and Meath are coming up on July 6 and 8.

So if you didn't get a chance to visit the Crowley farm in Cork last week then try to get along to one of these farm walks.

Irish Independent



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