Farm Ireland

Wednesday 26 October 2016

Begrudgery is alive and venomous as ever

Published 27/04/2016 | 02:30

Enda Kenny landed himself in some bother with his election campaign comment about
Enda Kenny landed himself in some bother with his election campaign comment about "whingers".

Wasn't it wonderful to see Michael O'Leary leading in the winner of the Grand National at Aintree?

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This completed the amazing feat of three major wins for an Irish owner that included the Irish Grand National and the Cheltenham Gold Cup. Capturing the biggest prizes in National Hunt racing has to be about as good as it gets.

Predictably however, instead of celebrating an Irish man's good fortune, the begrudgers and whingers were at it again the following week, complaining about how a successful man was enjoying some outstanding rewards for his efforts and the efforts of those who work for him.

Hasn't he got enough, they cried. I subsequently had at least four good arguments with people who could not see how we need hard working entrepreneurs like O'Leary who pay their taxes and spend their money here in Ireland.

Why can't we enjoy and be proud of their good fortune? Surely they are better than other multi-millionaires who choose to become tax exiles and live for much of the year outside the country of their birth? Just think of the huge spin off employment that comes from the presence of that huge string of racehorses and the benefits they bring to the rural economy.

Is this not better than some miserly individual, hoarding his wealth as so many have done in the past? Some people are seen as being exceptionally lucky but then we all get opportunities in life and only a few of us have the ability to make the most of them. I could go on because O'Leary is one of my heroes who puts his money where his mouth is and appears to fear no one.

And what a great mouth he has. He must be an interviewer's dream and can always be relied on to be vocal, entertaining and thought provoking. We need more like him.

This all reminded me of a farmer

I used to know telling me about a man who many years previously had arrived in to a small town in the West of Ireland with virtually nothing in his pockets.

As a result of hard work and business acumen, this man built up a haulage business that eventually made him very wealthy.

My farmer friend looked scornfully across the street at the large premises which now housed the entrepreneur's operation and then made the classic begrudger's comment "I remember him when he landed in this town without an arse to his trousers".

Rather than praising the man's achievements, he inferred that if you start with nothing, you have no right to succeed later in life.

This statement encapsulated scorn, envy and a total absence of admiration or charitable thinking. Weren't all these formerly considered sins of some form? Either mortal or venial it doesn't really matter. What does matter is the prevalence of this kind of thinking throughout Ireland.

We tend to heap scorn on our neighbours if they succeed where we have perhaps failed.

I don't want to describe the charitable and philanthropic work that the successful person in question subsequently undertook as it might give a hint as to who he is and probably embarrass him.

I am sure he would prefer to remain anonymous which is the hall mark of all such individuals. Enough said.

Well done Michael O'Leary and all others like you. May you continue to prosper and bring wealth and employment to your local communities. To repeat that fine old Irish saying "**** the begrudgers".


Enda Kenny made some remark about "whingers" recently.

For this he was vilified and subsequently had to clarify what he meant and sanitise his statement, presumably for political reasons. Yet he was absolutely correct and to my mind, shouldn't have apologised for simply stating the truth.

Just listen to Joe Duffy's radio programme for a sample of endless whinging as one caller after another goes on and on about what are often pathetic and groundless complaints.

One of the biggest crimes you can commit in Ireland is to succeed at whatever undertaking you are involved in.

The opposite applies in America where success is praised and children are encouraged to work hard and if they fail, start again. Even bankruptcy bears no stigma in the US. You only fail there if you fail to try again.

Indo Farming


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