Farm Ireland
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Sunday 4 December 2016

Become an Irish farrier and take on best in the business

Published 19/01/2010 | 05:00

BECOMING a farrier is an apprentice-based system that is operated by both the Irish Farriery Authority and FAS, and leads to a FETAC level-six qualification.

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Based in Curragh House, Co Kildare, the Irish Farriery Authority is the umbrella body for farriery in Ireland. It is responsible for the Irish School of Farriery -- the provider of farriery training in Ireland -- and the Irish Farriery Register -- a database of farriers practising in Ireland.

The first step towards becoming a farrier is to spend several weeks working with a qualified operator. The employer must hold a recognised farriery qualification, such as MF (IMFA), RF (BngC) or DWCF, and trade in Ireland.

This apprenticeship consists of seven phases. Phases 1, 3, 5, and 7 are on-the-job and completed with the employer.

Phase 2, 4 and 6 (off-the-job) are completed at the school.

Practical and theoretical elements of farriery are assessed during each phase. For further information, please contact your local FAS office.

The Irish School of Farriery is situated on the Racing at the Academy and Centre of Education (RACE) campus in Kildare town, Co Kildare.

The purpose-built forge at the school contains eight solid-fuel fires and two welding bays. Lectures are held in a lecture room contained within the facility.

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Trainees receive tuition in the theoretical aspects and practical skills of farriery.

The aim of the school is to train apprentice farriers to a European standard, allow existing farriers access to training, and provide seminars and short courses for horse owners.

Recent graduates of the school have already proven that they can compete with the best after securing silver and bronze medals at the Euroskills competition, which fielded farrier teams from nine other countries.

The Irish Farriery Authority will have a display stand and demonstration unit at the ITBA Expo in Goffs, Co Kildare, on January 29-30.

Irish Independent