Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Saturday 23 September 2017

Thieves are using drones to 'scope out' properties, farmer claims

Drones are being increasingly used for many purposes
Drones are being increasingly used for many purposes
Ciaran Moran

Ciaran Moran

A farmer has told how he believes criminals are now using drones to case out properties for valuable loot.

Speaking to Joe Duffy on RTE’s Liveline, Tipperary Farmer Robert O’Shea said he has highlighted the issue of drone use in his area.

“I myself had a drone fly over my property one night". He said his son was going through the farm office which is in a shed at the back of the house.

O’Shea said who said his property was burgled in August 2014 said his son heard a sound like a ‘loud bee’.

“He looked up and saw a red dot flying over the house.

“He followed the light and it went down over the farm yard then disappeared.

O’Shea said the problem with the drones is that “in themselves they are innocent, but in some cases the usage of them is to case out places”.

“I understand why private people are worried about drones flying over there property."

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He said whether urban or rural, people don’t like strangers intruding at the back of their house.

“If you go home tonight and find somebody in your backyard you won’t be too impressed. The drone is the very same thing flying over head,” he said.

O’Shea said he believes some drone users are ‘scoping’ to see where different items of machinery are on the farm.

“Also they can see if there is nobody around at that stage. They are using the drone to fly in over the farm yard. They can locate your diesel tank and any other exits or entrances.

“It makes life so so easy for these guys,” O’Shea said.

O’Shea says if people with drones approach a farmer and ask them to fly over their fields there is no problem.

“It’s a question of getting permission to do it,” he said.

Another listener rang into Liveline and said she thought drones were like a 'spying machines' and said "really and truly there should be a campaign to ban them".

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