Tuesday 17 October 2017

All-island deals on health 'will be at risk'

Attendees expressed their worries around the future for all-island health agreements, including the new cancer care unit in Derry, which caters for patients in Donegal and Northern Ireland. Stock photo: Getty Images
Attendees expressed their worries around the future for all-island health agreements, including the new cancer care unit in Derry, which caters for patients in Donegal and Northern Ireland. Stock photo: Getty Images
Colm Kelpie

Colm Kelpie

Concerns have been raised about the future of all-island health agreements following Britain's departure from the European Union.

Cross-Border cancer care, the impact on the arts community north and south, and Border businesses were among a range of topics discussed at the Government's latest public meeting on Brexit.

Attendees expressed their worries around the future for all-island health agreements, including the new cancer care unit in Derry, which caters for patients in Donegal and Northern Ireland.

Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs Minister Heather Humphreys said the Government understood rural communities' concerns.

Meanwhile, Katherine Licken, secretary general at the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, highlighted the close trading relationship between Northern Ireland and the Republic.

She said the UK was a "vitally important market" for Irish businesses.

"This is particularly the case for food and drink exports, which are so important to rural Ireland and also for Irish-owned firms in general as the UK is the most successful foreign market for Irish-owned firms in all sectors.

"Cross-Border trading relations are critically important.

"For example, 10pc of Irish milk for manufacturing is sourced in Northern Ireland, and 14pc of pigs produced in the south are slaughtered in the North," she said.

Irish Independent

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