Sunday 23 November 2014

EU driving licence comes into force

Published 18/01/2013 | 18:45

A common European Union driving licence comes into force on Saturday

An EU driving licence comes into force on Saturday - a credit card-style replacement for the more than 100 different paper and plastic licences currently in use by more than 300 million motorists across the 27 European member states.

The common-format licence for all EU drivers, with improved security protection, is part of a package of new measures proposed by Brussels and approved by EU ministers to improve free movement across borders, crack down on driving licence fraud and improve road safety across the EU.

"Traffic police across Europe are currently expected to recognise more than 100 different types of paper and plastic driving licence" said EU transport commissioner Siim Kallas.

"ID photos may be long out of date, the categories for which the driver is licensed unclear and the document may be easy to forge. Fake driving licences are a licence to kill, that is why we need licences which are easy to read, easy to understand and very difficult to falsify."

Existing licences are not affected, but will be changed to the new format at the time of renewal or at the latest by 2033.

The European driving licence, carrying standard-format information recognisable and easy to read by officials in all member states, can also be adapted to incorporate national symbols as decided by each member state. Security features make it "tamper proof and hard to fake", said the commission.

One advantage for drivers is less red tape when they move to live in a different EU country, thanks to a European electronic data exchange system between national administrations. The system also makes it harder for drivers banned in one country to carry on diving undetected in another.

The International Automobile Federation (FIA) said the change was a key step towards making cross-border travel easier and the counterfeiting of driving licences harder.

FIA region director general Jacob Bangsgaard said: "The new licence will not only make it easier to drive cross-border, it will also help to tackle the problem of drivers banned in one member state trying to get a licence in another country."

The changes to driving licences have no impact on current national driving test requirements which vary widely across the member states. However, basic examiner qualifications will be stepped up in member states where instructor requirements are currently minimal.

Press Association

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